Reviews for Lavazza

Review Date: Nov 2011

Price: $7.29/10 ounces

Astoundingly under-roasted and woody. Sweet-toned wood, peanut, perhaps a hint of flowers in the aroma. In the cup nothing but salty, bitterly sour wood and peanut skins (the skins, not the nuts). Somewhere amid all of that a tiny hint of flowers shimmers on. Plumps up just a bit in the finish, though the salty-sour sensations continue to dominate.

Review Date: Jan 2009

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Produced from an ESE pod on a FrancisFrancis! pod brewer. The low-acid wood and nut character of robusta dominates. Surprisingly lean mouthfeel, but the woody nut notes hint nicely at chocolate in the small cup and turn sweetly rich in the finish. Blooms nicely in milk with a gently fat dark chocolate character.

Review Date: Aug 2007

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Crisply sweet, deeply fruity aroma: cherry, sweet orange, milk chocolate. Slightly lean and sharp in the small cup, tartly sweet, with mild cedar and continuing citrusy and cherryish fruit notes. Moderately rich but simple, rather astringent finish. In milk blooms nicely with a cherryish dark chocolate. Slightly heavy finish.

Review Date: Jan 2003

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Reader “Cynmar69” reports this espresso blend “has a true coffee taste, …smooth and flavorsome unlike most burnt flavored coffees.” I found it full-bodied and fat on thetongue, with the kind of pleasantly fermented fruit tones that suggest chocolate-covered cherries.A shimmer of sharp acidity is balanced by sweetness. The finish is clean, rich and chocolaty.Slightly disappointing in small milk, where the coffee seems to simplify without softening, but inlarger milk the fruit and chocolate tones bloom nicely. The preground, canned format doubtlessaccounts for the subdued aroma.

Review Date: Mar 2002

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Flat, feeble, tea-like aroma. The cup is sweet but the acidity is weak-kneed and a bit sour. A pleasant hint of fruit, but not enough to save the cup from its general dull listlessness.

Review Date: Oct 1997

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Italians, it is said, don’t care for the acidity, the bright, dry sensation valued in American drip coffees. Ironically, this blended-in-Italy coffee displays more acidy notes than any other in the tasting. The dry, fruity notes enliven and lift the typically rounded Espresso profile. The roast adds smoky, spicy notes that dance on the edge of carbon without committing.